Home
The Farm
Cider
Draught Ciders »
Containers »
Crown Cap Bottles »
Sulphites »
diary
Food Fayres
How To Find Us
Photos
Links
Mail Ordr Cider
Farm Cider Blog

Mahorall Farm Cider

 

YouTube for Farm Cider
Environmental Policy

Our Environmental Policy

Today we all have a responsiblity to consider our impact on the environment.

With an active environmental policy, whether it is for business or personal consumption of energy, it is an important template to be able to assist awareness and to potentially improve how we operate.

Below is a list of activities and procedures we currently do

Apples / Orchards-
A natural crop which fruit every year. A resource which if the apples are used there is more chance of the recognition of importance of the orchard and could lead to improved management.

Our spent apple pulp is a by product from cider making Pulpand is a dry crumbly material which essentially consists of the skin, stalks and the flesh of the apples. We give this spent apple pommice to a local farmer for feeding to his cattle. This material has low nutritional value however is full of fibre and is apparently extremely popular! It provides the cattle with a feeding supplement during the winter and has also been proved to reduce the production of methane from the animal!

Making the cider-
A labour intensive task which uses only a small amount of electricity and water used for washing is from a borehole on the farm. No chemicals are used in the making of the cider or cleaning chemicals which could harm the environment.

Packaging-
The vast majority of our packaging can be recycled however the empahasis is on what the customer chooses to do. Glass and plastic bottles can be recycled where facilities exist and we encourage people to bring their own clean containers when they visit the farm for filling with cider. We do however feel at present that we have to at least offer customers a bag. We offer two types of bag: one is a standard plastic bag and we now offer a biodegradable bag. We also now recycle all our plastics that the cider business generates including pallet wrap and sample beakers.

In February 2010 a study was taken on the farm to work out the carbon footprint which we were responsible for. This is a recognised mechanism which identifys the amount of carbon we produce and also the amount of carbon that the woodland on the farm 'locks up'.